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Sweet! Jamaican Fruits...

by mountaingal
We've done birds, critters and plants, but don't think we've done the Jamaican fruits that we know and love.

i'm going to start with one of my favourites (brown and sweet, just like me /forums/images/graemlins/wink.gif ), the naseberry, also known in some places as sapodilla, Achras sapota, or Manilkara zapota.
http://www.thaitradesource.com/directories/familyexport/sapodilla.jpg http://www.australiantropicalfoods.com/images/sapodilla01.jpg

it's a source of vitamin C, calcium and phosphorus. i read on an website that the skin is not eaten, but me use to eat skin and all, except seed. a delicious and underrated fruit, IMO.

  • ((mountaingal)) how did you know i wanted to see a photo of the naseberry?? I always wondered what they looked like.....

    what is its taste?? is it just seasonal?? only in Jamaica.. I never heard of it before this board.. and there are others mentioned ..... will wait for more photos....
    - BND1999, 11 years ago
  • then there is the sweetsop, called sugar apple in the asian stores. i used to love this fruit so much, my country relatives used to put some aside for me if they knew i was coming...

    http://islamic-world.net/children/fruit/tropical%20fruit/pic/custard-apple-pic.gif

    sweetsopp is said to be ful of vitamin C, B6, and some B2.
    - mountaingal, 11 years ago
  • Originally posted by BND1999:
    ((mountaingal)) how did you know i wanted to see a photo of the naseberry?? I always wondered what they looked like.....

    what is its taste?? is it just seasonal?? only in Jamaica.. I never heard of it before this board.. and there are others mentioned ..... will wait for more photos.... ((Nina)), had i known you were curious about naseberry (which from my part of Jamaica we pronounce "neeseberry"}, i'd have started the thread earlier.

    let's see, how does it taste? when it is ripe it is intensely sweet, the flesh is soft, with just a hint of graininess. the smell is heavenly. as with all tropical fruits, if you cannot smell their scent, it means they're not ripe.

    you may be able to find one in chinatown where you are. they sell them here in toronto's chinatown, though i've never bought them here.
    - mountaingal, 11 years ago
  • ((Thanks MG))... first photo of a sweetsopp for me too....

    I would love to go to the market or in the country with you and others to see and taste all of these things....

    I go to Jamaica over and over again and still miss seeing and tasting so many of jamaicas delectables...

    maybe this trip i will make it a point to try some new things... Portland parish is so lush there must be lots growing there.. I remember all these fruit stands last time i was there... will stop.. and do a tasting..
    - BND1999, 11 years ago
  • Why did guinep season seem so fleeting to me? one minute nuff nuff a dem, next minute gone?

    Famed Jamaican photographer Ray Chen took this pic of guineps:
    http://www.jamaicaart.com/Guinnepsjpg.jpg

    this pic from the jamaica observer newspaper shows guineps that are a lickle on the old side - the green skin has turned from smooth to bumpy, and the flesh has turned from firm and translucent to soft and slightly opaque.

    http://www.golocaljamaica.com/imgz/guineps.JPG

    as kids we learned that babies shouldn't be given whole guinep seed as it could slip down into their throat and choke them. you have to chew it a little first and break up the seed before giving it to baby. i used to love the taste of guinep seed...
    - mountaingal, 11 years ago
  • Nina...you have to do that. Just find a fruit stand on the road...pull over YOUR RENTAL CAR /forums/images/graemlins/laugh.gif and start tasting...I know the fruit stand that I go to usually will let me taste before I buy. If I dont like what i taste...I dont have to buy it. He knows I am going to spend money no matter what so its no loss for him.

    MG...I love Naseberry too. I have had some that are so sweet that I feel like I am eating pure honey.

    My favorites have got to be June Plum...both green and ripe...soursop...Jack fruit and guinep. Got any pics of those? /forums/images/graemlins/laugh.gif
    - Ochigal, 11 years ago
  • Ochigal.. if i come in july... you gonna do a tasting with me?? Would love to meander with you!!!
    - BND1999, 11 years ago
  • Rose Apple

    Like many other fruits to which the word "apple" has been attached, the rose apple in no way resembles an apple, neither in the tree nor in its fruit. It is a member of the myrtle family, Myrtaceae, and is technically known as Syzygium jambos Alston (syn. Eugenia jambos L.; Jambosa jambos Millsp.; Jambosa vulgaris DC.; Caryophyllus jambos Stokes).

    The term "rose apple" (in French, pomme rose, pommier rose; in Spanish, poma rosa, pomarrosa, manzana rosa, or manzanita de rosa) is so widely employed that the species has few alternate names apart from those in the many local dialects of Africa, India, Malaya, southeastern Asia, the East Indies and Oceania. It is sometimes called jambosier by French-speaking people, plum rose or malabar plum in the English-speaking West Indies, pommeroos or appelroos in Surinam, and jambeiro or jambo amarelo in Brazil; jaman in India, and yambo in the Philippines.

    http://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/morton/images/Figure103.jpg
    Description

    The rose apple tree may be merely a shrub but is generally a tree reaching 25 or even 40 ft (7.5-12 m) in height, and has a dense crown of slender, wide-spreading branches, often the overall width exceeding the height. The evergreen leaves are opposite, lanceolate or narrow-elliptic, tapering to a point; 4 to 9 in (10-22 cm) long, and from 1 to 2 1/2 in (2.5-6.25 cm) wide; somewhat leathery, glossy, dark-green when mature, rosy when young. The flowers are creamy-white or greenish-white, 2 to 4 in (5-10 cm) wide, consisting mostly of about 300 conspicuous stamens to 1 1/2 in (4 cm) long, a 4-lobed calyx, and 4 greenish-white, concave petals. There are usually 4 or 5 flowers together in terminal clusters. Capped with the prominent, green, tough calyx, the fruit is nearly round, oval, or slightly pear-shaped, 1 1/2 to 2 in (4-5 cm) long, with smooth, thin, pale-yellow or whitish skin, sometimes pink-blushed, covering a crisp, mealy, dry to juicy layer of yellowish flesh, sweet and resembling the scent of a rose in flavor. In the hollow center, there are 1 to 4 brown, rough-coated, medium-hard, more or less rounded seeds, 3/8 to 5/8 in (1-1.6 cm) thick, which loosen from the inner wall and rattle when the fruit is shaken. Fragments of the seedcoat may be found in the cavity.

    Origin and Distribution

    The rose apple is native to the East Indies and Malaya and is cultivated and naturalized in many parts of India, Ceylon and former Indochina and the Pacific Islands. It was introduced into Jamaica in 1762 and became well distributed in Bermuda, the Bahamas, the West Indies and, at low and medium elevations, from southern Mexico to Peru. In Guatemala, the tree may be planted as a living fencepost or in hedgerows around coffee plantations. For this purpose, it is drastically pruned to promote dense growth. It grows wild abundantly, forming solid stands and thickets, in Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, Guatemala, Honduras and Panama

    Source http://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/morton/rose_apple.html
    - SandiF, 11 years ago
  • Custard Apple
    http://wwwchem.uwimona.edu.jm:1104/gifs/custappl.jpg

    Both in tree and in fruit, the custard apple, Annona reticulata L., is generally rated as the mediocre or "ugly duckling" species among the prominent members of this genus. Its descriptive English name has been widely misapplied to other species and to the hybrid ATEMOYA, and it is sometimes erroneously termed "sugar apple", "sweetsop" and, by Spanish-speaking people, "anon" or "rinon", in India, "ramphal", all properly applied only to Annona squamosa. It has, itself, acquired relatively few appropriate regional names. Most commonly employed as an alternate name in English-speaking areas is bullock's-heart or bull's-heart; in French, coeur de boeuf; Portuguese, coracao de boi; in Spanish, often merely corazon—all alluding to its form and external blush. The skin color is reflected in the Bolivian name, chirimoya roia, the Salvadoran anona rosada, and the Guatemalan anona roja or anona colorada. In the latter country it is also known as anona de seso. Araticum ape or araticum do mato are additional names in Brazil. Some people refer to it as Jamaica apple, or as netted custard apple, which is translated as anona de redecilla in Honduras and Nicaragua. Cachiman, cachiman coeur de boeuf and corossol sauvage may be heard in the French-influenced West Indies.

    In the Netherlands Antilles it is kasjoema. This name and boeah nona are used in Surinam. In Cuba, it is mamon or chirimoya. Some Central Americans give it the name anona, or anonillo; Colombians, anon pelon. To the Carib Indians the fruit was known as alacalyoua; to the Aztecs, quaultzapotl, and to the Maya, tsulimay, tsulilpox, tsulipox, pox, oop, or op. It is generally called in the Philippines sarikaya; in India ramphal, nona or luvuni, in Malaya, nona kapri, or lonang; in Thailand, noi nong";; in Cambodia, mo bat or mean bat; in Laos, khan tua lot; in South Vietnam, binh bat; North Vietnam, qua na.

    The custard apple tree is not especially attractive. It is erect, with a rounded or spreading crown and trunk 10 to 14 in (25-35 cm) thick. Height ranges from 15 to 35 ft (4.5-10 m). The ill-smelling leaves are deciduous, alternate, oblong or narrow-lanceolate, 4 to 8 in (10-20 cm) long, 3/4 to 2 in (2 5 cm) wide, with conspicuous veins. Flowers, in drooping clusters, are fragrant, slender, with 3 outer fleshy, narrow petals 3/4 to 1 1/4 in (2 3 cm) long; light-green externally and pale-yellow with a dark-red or purple spot on the inside at the base. The flowers never fully open.

    The compound fruit, 3 l/4 to 6 1/2 in (8-16 cm) in diameter, may be symmetrically heart-shaped, lopsided, or irregular; or nearly round, or oblate, with a deep or shallow depression at the base. The skin, thin but tough, may be yellow or brownish when ripe, with a pink, reddish or brownish-red blush, and faintly, moderately, or distinctly reticulated. There is a thick, cream-white layer of custardlike, somewhat granular, flesh beneath the skin surrounding the concolorous moderately juicy segments, in many of which there is a single, hard, dark-brown or black, glossy seed, oblong, smooth, less than 1/2 in (1.25 cm) long. Actual seed counts have been 55, 60 and 76. A pointed, fibrous, central core, attached to the thick stem, extends more than halfway through the fruit. The flavor is sweet and agreeable though without the distinct character of the cherimoya, sugar apple, or atemoya.

    Origin and Distribution

    The custard apple is believed to be a native of the West Indies but it was carried in early times through Central America to southern Mexico. It has long been cultivated and naturalized as far south as Peru and Brazil. It is commonly grown in the Bahamas and occasionally in Bermuda and southern Florida.

    Apparently it was introduced into tropical Africa early in the 17th century and it is grown in South Africa as a dooryard fruit tree. In India the tree is cultivated, especially around Calcutta, and runs wild in many areas. It has become fairly common on the east coast of Malaya, and more or less throughout southeast Asia and the Philippines though nowhere particularly esteemed. Eighty years ago it was reported as thoroughly naturalized in Guam. In Hawaii it is not well known.

    Source http://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/morton/custard_apple.html

    Hog Apple, Duppy Soursop, Noni
    http://wwwchem.uwimona.edu.jm:1104/gifs/hogappl.jpg
    - SandiF, 11 years ago
  • you know Sandi, down in St. Elizabeth where i grew, custard apple was rare. i knew of only one family that had the tree in their yard, and i remember eating it only once. i wonder if the "ill-smelling" leaves mentioned in your post are the reason why more people didn't have custard apple tree in their yard.
    - mountaingal, 11 years ago
  • Pomegranate, commonly called Pananganat[/b]
    http://wwwchem.uwimona.edu.jm:1104/gifs/pomgran1.jpg

    Mammee Apple

    http://wwwchem.uwimona.edu.jm:1104/gifs/mammy.jpg

    Origin and geographical distribution : West Indies, northern South America, under hot lowland climates.

    Status : Cultivated. Marketed locally.

    Description : Tree to 25 m, with a very resistant bark, propagated by seeds (most commonly, germination in ca. 60 days) or graft. Male, female and hermaphrodite trees. Slow growth. Fruit large (up to 4 kg), spherical, 8-20 cm in diameter, solitary, light brown, with a thick leathery skin (ca. 2 mm) an orange, non fibrous, juicy but firm pulp, and 1-4 large seeds.

    Uses : Fruit salad, jam, marmalade, compote pastries, sherbets, pastes, preserves in syrup jelly from slightly under-ripe fruits, rich in pectin. The leaves are used to prepare a distilled aromatic, refreshing and digestive drink: "l'eau des créoles". The seeds are used to prepare an insecticide, particularly against lice. Leaves are wrapped around young tomato plants to protect them from insects (Puerto Rico). The think and yellow bark gum or the resin from the immature fruit are melted with fat and applied to the feet to combat chiggers and used to rid animals of fleas and ticks (Mexico, Jamaica). The insecticide properties of mamey have been verified experimentally. The most potent appeared to be the seed kernel. Some toxic effect was observed on mammals and fishes too.

    The mamey wood is heavy, hard, but not difficult to work, fine-grained, and strong. It has an attractive grain and polishes well. Morton mentions a report of an antibiotic principle in the mamey.

    Source http://www.ciat.cgiar.org/ipgri/fruits_from_americas/frutales/Ficha%20Mammea%20americana.htm

    Jamaican Cherry
    http://wwwchem.uwimona.edu.jm:1104/gifs/cherry.jpg
    - SandiF, 11 years ago
  • For ochi - june plum, also one of my favourites:
    http://www.gracefoods.com/Carib_Fruits/june%20plum1.jpg

    green with salt, or ripe with all their tangy goodness, nothing like a june plum. it takes skill to get to the flesh around the spiny seeds - my gums have been known to bleed, lol!

    here's a pic of a june plum tree in Portmore:
    http://www.portmore.org/album/p0899-14.jpg
    - mountaingal, 11 years ago
  • *Clap clap clap* Wonderful thread so far MG. :bigup: I'm eating it up /forums/images/graemlins/laugh.gif
    - rebelgirl, 11 years ago
  • A Mouth watering thread! :bigup: ..Anything on starapple? Jackfruit? a couple of my top favorites
    - DC, 11 years ago
  • ((rebel))...was feeling a little blue, so thought i'd do something that never fails to cheer me up - a thread about Jamaica's natural history...

    ochi, soon come wid de soursop...just wanted to get in this little beauty, the starapple, the purple and the green varieties:
    http://images.google.ca/images?q=tbn:pweZ-QDNhRUC:www.australiantropicalfoods.com/images/Starapple.jpg http://www.montego-bay-jamaica.com/ajal/croydon/kiwi.jpg

    the trees are very tall, and have beautiful leaves, green on one side, copper on the other as seen in this pic:
    http://www.troagri.com.cn/trocrops/starapple.GIF

    here's the thing about starapples: they have a lot of latex like sap in the fruit, so they are known to be "binding" - eat too many of them and you get a severe case of constipation! also, the fruit doesn't drop from the tree when ripe, the tree holds on to the fruit. so if someone says you're mean like a starapple tree, they're not complimenting you, lol! we used to pick the fruit from the tree with long sticks.
    - mountaingal, 11 years ago
  • ((DC)) was researching starapple when you posted...soon come wid jackfruit.

    Nina - make sure you take an experienced person with you when you go fruit tasting/shopping in JA. Plenty fruit are "force ripe", meaning they LOOK ripe through some chemical process, but are not in fact, ripe on the inside. remember, the fruit has to have a definite, musky smell to be ripe.

    okay, ochigal, here's soursop:

    http://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/morton/images/Plate10.jpg

    very versatile fruit, much loved for juicing, although i could eat a piece of soursop just by itself...mmmm...

    my gran-aunty used to tie soursop leaves to her head when she felt poorly.
    - mountaingal, 11 years ago
  • I think it's only 3 times I've eaten a custard apple, and I didn't quite like the taste.

    'Tinkin' Toe

    http://wwwchem.uwimona.edu.jm:1104/gifs/stinktoe.jpg

    Actual Name: Hymenaea courbaril

    Common Names: Jatoba, jatobá, stinking toe, algarrobo, azucar huayo, jataí, copal, Brazilian copal, courbaril, nazareno, Cayenne copal, demarara copal, gomme animee, pois confiture, guapinol, guapinole, loksi, South American locust

    Part Used: Bark, resin, leaves

    atoba is a huge canopy tree, growing to 30 m in height, indigenous to the Amazon rainforest and parts of tropical Central America. It produces bright green leaves, white, fragrant flowers that are pollinated by bats, and an oblong, brown, pod-like fruit with large seeds inside. The fruit is considered edible although hardly tasty; one of its common names, “stinking toe,” is used to describe the smell and taste of the fruit! In the Peruvian Amazon the tree is called azucar huayo and, in Brazil, jatobá. The Hymenaea genus comprises two dozen species of tall trees distributed in tropical parts of South America, Mexico, and Cuba.

    Several species of Hymenaea, including jatoba, produce usable resins. At the base of the jatoba tree, an orange, sticky, resinous gum collects which is dug up and burned as incense, used in the manufacture of varnishes, and employed medicinally. Indians in the Amazon have long used this copal resin in magic rituals, love potions and in wedding ceremonies. The genus name Hymenaea is derived from Hymen, the Greek God of marriage, referring to the green leaflets that always occur in matching pairs. The resin of Hymenaea trees converts to amber through a remarkable chemical process requiring millions of years. During this process, volatile mono- and sesquiterpene phytochemicals leach out of the resin and nonvolatile diterpene chemicals bond together. This forms a hard polymer that is resistant to natural decay processes and the ravages of time. As portrayed in the Jurassic Park movies, amber of million-year-old Hymenaea trees have provided scientists with many clues to its prehistoric presence on earth as well as to the insects and other plants encased in it.

    Jatoba also has an ancient history of use with the indigenous tribes of the rainforest. In addition to the resin, the bark of the tree is macerated by the Karaja Indians in Peru and Creole people in Guyana to treat diarrhea. In Ka’apor ethnobotany, jatoba is taken orally to stop excessive menstrual discharge, applied to wounded or sore eyes, and used as a vermifuge. It is used medicinally in the Peruvian Amazon for cystitis, hepatitis, prostatitis, and cough. In the Brazilian Amazon, the sap is used for coughs and bronchitis, and a bark tea is used for stomach problems as well as foot and nail fungus.

    It would follow that jatoba has a long history of use in herbal medicine systems throughout South America. It was first recorded in Brazil in 1930. The bark was described by Dr. J. Monteiro Silva as being carminative, and astringent, and recommended for hematuria, diarrhea, dysentery, general fatigue, dyspepsia, constipation, bexiga, and hemoptysis. The resin was recommended for all types of upper respiratory and cardiopulmonary problems. According to Dr. Silva, whoever drinks jatoba bark tea feels “. . . strong and vigorous, with a good appetite, always ready to work.” In 1965, the traditional uses of jatoba were still being employed much as they had been since the ’30s, and a liquid extract called Vinho de Jatobá was widely sold throughout Brazil as a tonic and fortificant, for energy, and for numerous other disorders. In Brazilian herbal medicine today, jatoba bark and resin is still recommended for the same indications and problems as it has since 1930—and is documented to be tonic, stomachic, astringent, balsamic, antifungal, vermifuge, pectoral, and hemostatic. It is employed for diarrhea, prostatitis, cystitis, dysentery, intestinal colic, coughs, bronchitis, catarrh, asthma, and pulmonary weakness. Jatoba bark tea is still quite a popular drink among lumberjacks working in the forests in Brazil: it is a natural energy tonic that helps them to work long hours without fatigue. In traditional medicine in Panama, the fruit is used to treat mouth ulcers and the leaves and wood are used for diabetes. In the United States, jatoba is used as a natural energy tonic, for such respiratory ailments as asthma, laryngitis, and bronchitis, as a douche for yeast infections and as a decongestant. It is also used in the treatment of hemorrhages, bursitis, bladder infections, arthritis, prostatitis, yeast and fungal infections, cystitis, and is applied topically for such skin and nail fungus. At present, none of the research has indicated that jatoba has any toxicity. One study highlighted the mild allergic effect that jatoba resin may have when used externally.

    Phytochemical anaylsis of jatoba shows that it is rich in biologically active compounds including diterpenes, sesquiterpenes, flavonoids, and oligosaccharides. The phytochemical makeup of jatoba is very similar to another resin-producing rainforest tree, copaiba, which is also featured in this book. Some of these same chemicals occuring in both plants (such as copalic acid, delta-cadinene, caryophyllene and alpha-humulene) have shown to exhibit significant cytotoxic, antimicrobial, antifungal and antitumor activities in clinical studies. In other research, another of jatoba’s phytochemicals, astilbin, was shown in a 1997 clinical study to provide antioxidant and liver-protective properties. Jatoba also contains terpenes and phenolics which are responsible for protecting the tree from fungi in the rainforest. In fact, the jatoba tree is one of the few trees in the rainforest that sports a completely clean trunk bark, without any of the usual mold and fungus found on many other trees in this wet and humid environment. These terpenes and phenolics have been documented in several studies over the years and the antifungal activity of jatoba is attributed to these chemicals. In addition to its antifungal properties, jatoba also has been documented to have anti-yeast activity against a wide range of organisms including Candida.

    Other clinical studies have been performed on jatoba since the early 1970s which have shown that it has antimicrobial, molluscicidal, and antibacterial activities, including in vitro actions against such organisms as E. coli, Psuedomonas, Staphylococcus and Bacillus. In addition, a water extract of jatoba leaves has demonstrated significant hypoglycemic activity, producing a significant reduction in plasma glucose levels (which validates another traditional use).

    Practitioners have long reported that jatoba has shown good results with acute and chronic cystitis and prostatitis. Many practitioners today are discovering that these chronic conditions can oftentimes be fungal in nature rather than bacterial. The widespread use of antibiotics to treat these types of cases can actually kill off friendly bacteria which live off fungi—and increase the chances of a fungal problem or encourage fungal growth—even to the point of making the condition chronic. When these types of chronic prostatitis and cystitis cases react so quickly and dramatically to jatoba supplements, is it probably from jatoba’s antifungal and anti-yeast properties at work, not its antibacterial properties.

    Natural health practitioners in the United States are learning of jatoba’s many uses and employing it as a natural remedy for prostatitis and cystitis, as a healthful tonic for added energy (without any caffeine or harmful stimulants), and for many fungal and yeast problems such as Candida, athlete’s foot, and stubborn nail fungus. It is a wonderful, helpful natural remedy from an important and ancient rainforest resource.

    Traditional Remedy: One-half to one cup bark decoction 1–3 times daily or 1–3 ml of a 4:1 tincture twice daily. A strong bark decoction or standard tincture diluted with water and a small amount of cider vinegar is used topically for skin or nail fungi or employed as a douche for yeast infections.

    Contraindications: Jatoba leaves have been documented to have a hypoglycemic effect and, as such, should be used under practitioner supervision in those with hypoglycemia or on medication to lower their blood glucose levels.

    Source http://www.rain-tree.com/jatoba.htm
    - SandiF, 11 years ago
  • Originally posted by BND1999:
    Ochigal.. if i come in july... you gonna do a tasting with me?? Would love to meander with you!!! Silly girl...do you have to ask? /forums/images/graemlins/laugh.gif

    Heck...Meander is my middle name. /forums/images/graemlins/tongue.gif
    - Ochigal, 11 years ago
  • i can almost feel my salivary glands begin to ache in my jaw corners as i type the name of this next fruit, tamarind:

    http://ile-maurice.tripod.com/tamarind.jpg

    the outer shell of the tamarind pod is brittle, and the inside flesh very sticky and SOUR:
    http://gourmetsleuth.com/Images/tamarind.jpg

    tamarind balls (the flesh scraped off the seeds and mixed with sugar) are a popular Jamaican treat. the Trinidadians add a bit of pepper to the tamarind ball for a little kick - i love those ones: sweet, sour and spicy all in one.

    the tamarind tree is very stately and beautiful, the leaves reminding me of the shame-old-lady plant.
    - mountaingal, 11 years ago
  • My favourite fruit, the Otahitie Apple. Hmmm, mouth watering. Living in Barbican, we had two Otahitie Apple trees in the yard. The blossoms smelled heavenly, and the apples were simply delightfully succulent. Yummy.

    Otahitie Apple Syzygium malaccense

    http://wwwchem.uwimona.edu.jm:1104/gifs/oapple.gif

    Apple blossoms.
    http://wwwchem.uwimona.edu.jm:1104/gifs/otaheite.gif
    - SandiF, 11 years ago
  • Oh thank you ((MG)))!. Always liked your informative threads.. /forums/images/graemlins/smile.gif

    Love those purple starapples; I just can't get into the green ones. When is starapple season? Is it around Christmas time? Can't remember...


    the fruit doesn't drop from the tree when ripe, the tree holds on to the fruit.Never knew this..
    - DC, 11 years ago
  • mmmm...lovely pic of that otaheite apple, Sandi, and of the blossom - i'd forgotten what they looked like!

    i've had rose apple a couple times...they're nice but the perfume of the fruit was a little disconcerting, felt i should be dabbing it on instead of eating it...

    saw a mammee apple in the west indian store yesterday, but am not familiar with that fruit at all...
    - mountaingal, 11 years ago
  • Originally posted by SandiF:
    My favourite fruit, the Otahitie Apple. Hmmm, mouth watering. Living in Barbican, we had two Otahitie Apple trees in the yard. The blossoms smelled heavenly, and the apples were simply delightfully succulent. Yummy.

    Otahitie Apple Syzygium malaccense

    http://wwwchem.uwimona.edu.jm:1104/gifs/oapple.gif

    Apple blossoms.
    http://wwwchem.uwimona.edu.jm:1104/gifs/otaheite.gif I swear this was the apple in the Garden of Eden dat Eve ate..no wonda she cudden resist..lol

    I just cannot get into American apples. After having tasted of our Jamaican apple, I just know I will not experience that same delicious mouth watering taste..

    Bwoy, oonu really mek people want fi booka flight-just fi goh eat some of these fruits right now..
    - DC, 11 years ago
  • Moderators,

    Please to lak dis dung!!.

    I find this thread to be most offensive and I am deeply hurt at the cruelty of the posters.

    Why go to the extent that you have to make me feel this way?? :shameu:

    A which roadside stan oonoo si up yasso weh a sell dem nicle looking fruits deh? It nevva bad enuff dat oonoo mention di name oonoo did haffi post pictcha to?? :rolleyes:

    Moderators, I repeat, pls to lak it dung. I cannot bear di trauma to mi likkle heart /forums/images/graemlins/frown.gif

    (H)AnnA(H) run off gaan tek har meds before di place staat spin again. A wudda gi mi arm an leg an piece a mi chess fi get a bite outa one a dem neeseberry deh. Oh di trauma!!
    - tonirand, 11 years ago
  • who remember the tall tale about guavas - that if you eat too many the seeds will collect in your tripe..?!? bwoy, the things we used to believe as pickney.

    there are many varieties of guava, some have green skin when they're ripe, most have yellow skin. some have red inside, some have yellow, some are almost white, most have pink. all are fleshy and like most country pickney, i ate the skin and all. the tree doesn't grow very tall, the bark is slippery and the leaves are aromatic.

    http://www.wegmans.com/kitchen/ingredients/produce/fruit/images/guava.jpg http://www.hawaii-products.com/storyarchives/treatsaloha_images/guava.jpg
    - mountaingal, 11 years ago
  • Originally posted by (H)AnnA(H):
    Moderators,

    Please to lak dis dung!!.

    I find this thread to be most offensive and I am deeply hurt at the cruelty of the posters.

    Why go to the extent that you have to make me feel this way?? :shameu:

    A which roadside stan oonoo si up yasso weh a sell dem nicle looking fruits deh? It nevva bad enuff dat oonoo mention di name oonoo did haffi post pictcha to?? :rolleyes:

    Moderators, I repeat, pls to lak it dung. I cannot bear di trauma to mi likkle heart /forums/images/graemlins/frown.gif

    (H)AnnA(H) run off gaan tek har meds before di place staat spin again. A wudda gi mi arm an leg an piece a mi chess fi get a bite outa one a dem neeseberry deh. Oh di trauma!! LOL! ((Anna)) hush me love. summertime, god spare we life, we go chinatown go pick up couple neeseberry...
    - mountaingal, 11 years ago
  • arite, who besides ochi, DC and me want jackfruit?

    http://www.nt.gov.au/dbird/dpif/plants/horticulture/images/jackfruit_extra_big.jpg

    it is the largest fruit to grow on a tree.

    http://www.tradewindsfruit.com/jackfruit.jpg

    they sell this fruit very expensive in chinatown, a little piece can cost $8. i find it almost unbearable to walk past some of the fruitstands in summer, the smell of the cut jackfruit is so intense and inviting. when i eat it, it's like eating sweet meat. the seeds are good boiled, i hear, but i can't remember much about that.
    - mountaingal, 11 years ago
  • Aye MG,

    Mi hed hat mi fi si dem. Mi sen wen mi go home mi boun fi get kallic cause mi a nyam di wol a dem one time!!

    Laed mi tell yu. Mi did live beside a nice lady wah did have some big custad apple pon har tree an shi tell wi seh wi cudda pik dem wen wi want. All 3 time fi di maaning mi go tell har howdy do so mi cudda get one.

    Not to mention di guava tree up di road. Mi still have di scar pon mi shin fram di day mi a try sneak troo di fence an bab wiyah ketch mi :eek:

    Ah well..... dem were di days mi dear. Mi miss mi yaad /forums/images/graemlins/frown.gif
    - tonirand, 11 years ago
  • You know, MG, I feel the same way about Rose Apple. The scent is a bit too perfumy and heady. My mother used to use the rose apple leaf to make a tea, but I can't remember for what purpose. Must ask her...

    The American apples cannot walk wid fi wi Otahitie Apple. In Portland on my father's family farm, they grow apple trees and mi a tell yu sey, one year I visited my uncle, and it was apple season. I nyam apple so til mi clide that day!
    - SandiF, 11 years ago
  • Did you know that you can roast and eat the Jackfruit seeds?

    Also, I always hear not to eat a certain section of the Jackfruit because it's poisonous. Anybody ever heard of that..?
    - SandiF, 11 years ago
  • no, sandi, i haven't heard about a part of the jackfruit being poisonous. i'll look lickle more into that, see what i can find.

    you know what jus pass thru my mind? the lickle green tip on top of the etiote apple, that tasted so nice and tangy....

    bwoy, what my kids are missing by not growing up in ja...
    - mountaingal, 11 years ago
  • Originally posted by mountaingal:
    arite, who besides ochi, DC and me want jackfruit?

    http://www.nt.gov.au/dbird/dpif/plants/horticulture/images/jackfruit_extra_big.jpg

    it is the largest fruit to grow on a tree.

    http://www.tradewindsfruit.com/jackfruit.jpg

    (H)AnnA(H) faint weh


    If I have a sleepless night tonight, I will be pleased to blame MG an sandiF :shameu:
    - tonirand, 11 years ago
  • and to think that this "fruit" is a member of the grass family...

    http://www.switcheroo.com/Photos/sugarcane.jpg...

    http://www.intl-pag.org/icons/sugarcane.gif
    when i lived in Kingston in the late 90s, i used to treat myself to sugar cane couple nights per week...i'd say it was a way to keep my teeth and gums in condition, -- all that chewing of the sugar cane fibre to extract as much juice as possible...then the struggle not to drool all the juice over your chin and chest....aaaahhh, sweet!

    i loved to see the cane men in motion, the way they could select just the right one from the bunch of cane in the cart, then quickly strip it and (if you want) cut it up into bite sized pieces. then you had those outfits that would juice cane right there for you... never got into those, cause they never stripped the cane first and i wondered what kind of dirt was getting into the juice.

    it's too bad that sugarcane has such a horrible political history...right now in florida you have cane workers living in near slavery conditions on sugarcane plantations.
    - mountaingal, 11 years ago
  • who was brave enough to eat this particular fruit?

    http://wwwcjb.unige.ch/BotSyst/APG2/Rosid_3/100_ANA_17.jpg

    yes, the cashew fruit, the bottom of which grew the cashew nut. i remember that this fruit was so acidic it was almost like sharp knives were attacking your lips and tongue!

    and we all knew how harsh the oil of cashew was - we'd cut it in half and press it into our forearm: the oil would burn the shape of the cashew onto our skin. then we'd roast the cashews, they'd be spitting and jumping in the fire, but oh...the smell! then we'd crack them open and eat them.

    then days later, our hands would be stripping from handling all that volatile cashew oil from the seed.

    here's a pic of cashew fruit on a tree:
    http://www.biologie.uni-hamburg.de/b-online/fo51/cashu.jpg
    - mountaingal, 11 years ago
  • Originally posted by mountaingal:

    bwoy, what my kids are missing by not growing up in ja... MG, dat me think bout every DAY! Some how one or two trips a year @ 10-14 days each time just doesnt seem like enough. /forums/images/graemlins/frown.gif
    - Ochigal, 11 years ago
  • MG yuh a kill mi man! Mi mout noh stap wata since mi open dis thread! :irie: :irie:

    Cyan yuh fine ennyting bout tinkin toe? /forums/images/graemlins/smile.gif
    - bandido1, 11 years ago
  • bandi, see Sandi put supm bout tinkin toe pon page 1. no tell me you used to love dat... :eek:
    - mountaingal, 11 years ago
  • mg...you wouldnt beleive the dream I had last night...pure Jamaican fruit in it. I was buying Mangoes that already had bites outa them just cause I had to have them. Tinkin toe inna my bag even.

    Then I had to hike up a huge hill to my house with bags and bags of fruit...thankfully that part was dream, but sure wish the rest was real. Well except for the half eaten mangoes :rolleyes:

    /forums/images/graemlins/laugh.gif
    - Ochigal, 11 years ago
  • Originally posted by mountaingal:
    bandi, see Sandi put supm bout tinkin toe pon page 1. no tell me you used to love dat... :eek: Mi try ie wan time wen mi was a likkle bway, den mi here seh if ie choke yuh, yuh haffe eat parch dog doo-doo! :eek: :eek: Dat was de laas time it tuch mi lips! Ugh!! :eek: :eek:
    - bandido1, 11 years ago
  • Originally posted by Ochigal:
    mg...you wouldnt beleive the dream I had last night...pure Jamaican fruit in it. I was buying Mangoes that already had bites outa them just cause I had to have them. Tinkin toe inna my bag even.

    Then I had to hike up a huge hill to my house with bags and bags of fruit...thankfully that part was dream, but sure wish the rest was real. Well except for the half eaten mangoes :rolleyes:

    /forums/images/graemlins/laugh.gif lol! Ochi, glad seh a no me one weh get obsessed wid J'can fruits.

    den lass night me ponder and me ponder about de mango question...how fe fine pics of the diffrent varieties when what we call dem in Jamaica is not what other people call them elsewhere...

    still pondering...

    julie, number eleven, greenskin, hairy, east indian, haden, bombay...
    - mountaingal, 11 years ago
  • DWL@bandi. :eek: /forums/images/graemlins/laugh.gif

    Otaheiti apples...(we called them Ethiopian apples.) *sigh* I remember living in Richmond, St. Mary and would walk the tracks to go to town, workers along the tracks would cook around the base of that particular tree and every time I passed there, they'd get some of the apples for me to eat. :irie: I sure miss those days!

    Last time I went to JA, they were out of season and I couldn't get any at all. /forums/images/graemlins/frown.gif
    - Simmy, 11 years ago
  • If a laugh a ded @ bandido.

    Mi used to eat it bredda. It did have a sweet sticky cloying taste, and di scent did really cling pon yu. Actually mi did always find the scent cloyingly sweet more than stink.

    Surprised when the fruit facts state that it has medicinal purposes.


    Originally posted by bandido1:
    Mi try ie wan time wen mi was a likkle bway, den mi here seh if ie choke yuh, yuh haffe eat parch dog doo-doo! :eek: :eek: Dat was de laas time it tuch mi lips! Ugh!! :eek: :eek:
    - SandiF, 11 years ago
  • Hello again oonoo

    From laas nite a pure fruit deh pon mi mind /forums/images/graemlins/frown.gif

    Mi memba a likkl eone name cherry-meela. Mi fren from Sav use to call it Jimbelin.

    Gats anyting on dat please?

    Tanky
    - tonirand, 11 years ago
  • http://freshmangos.com/images/3haden_small.jpg
    can you guess this mango? /forums/images/graemlins/smile.gif
    its a haden..
    - H_O, 11 years ago
  • Anna, jimbelin wain de pan me liss, but dang if i know what it call officially, so me can fine it pon de Net. me wi try later tonight.

    HO, was wondering when you'd show up - was certain it would be to tell us the recipe for jackfruit seed.

    thanks for the pic of the haden mango /forums/images/graemlins/cool.gif see if you can fine some more varieties nuh?
    - mountaingal, 11 years ago
  • http://wwwchem.uwimona.edu.jm:1104/gifs/fpeanut.jpg guess this...
    - H_O, 11 years ago
  • http://wwwchem.uwimona.edu.jm:1104/gifs/anatt2.jpg
    - H_O, 11 years ago
  • HO, a wah kinna fruit dem deh massa? me no know neida wan a dem deh...
    - mountaingal, 11 years ago
  • and you know the other day when i went to kensington market, i bought some red coat plum /forums/images/graemlins/smile.gif
    - H_O, 11 years ago
  • prickly one is annoto, and the other is french peanut....
    as for roasted jackfruit seeds-well i like them boiled in salt water /forums/images/graemlins/smile.gif -lots of salt...
    - H_O, 11 years ago
  • http://www.saalfelds.freeserve.co.uk/ugli1.JPG

    check out the ugli fruit...a friend of mine up in Trouthall- near to frankfield inna CLarendon grows lots of citrus...actually, Trouthall is famous for its oranges and citrus
    - H_O, 11 years ago
  • I remember when I was a girl and visited my uncle in St. Mary. There was a grove of guavas right in front of his property across di road; stretching waaay off into the distance.. We used to wander and just pick the guavas off the trees and eat them right there. Sometimes after we bit into them we see worms nestled among the pink fleshy parts. We just threw them away and picked annedda wan.

    As for jackfruits, I am of the belief that St. Mary has the most jackfruit trees. Bwouy oh boy, I remember the huge ones that grew on my uncles property as well, along with ackees. Mi neva like jackfruit seeds; why eat that when mi cyaan eat di real ting? /forums/images/graemlins/laugh.gif
    - britisha, 11 years ago
  • anybadi mention MAWMIE yet...mi woulda give Bob Marley millions fi a mawmie rite now...anymore deh a yard doh... a long time mi no see a mawmie at all
    - evanovitch, 11 years ago
  • Originally posted by evanovitch:
    anybadi mention MAWMIE yet...mi woulda give Bob Marley millions fi a mawmie rite now...anymore deh a yard doh... a long time mi no see a mawmie at all Mawmee, a wha name soh Missis?
    /forums/images/graemlins/laugh.gif /forums/images/graemlins/laugh.gif
    - britisha, 11 years ago
  • Originally posted by evanovitch:
    anybadi mention MAWMIE yet...mi woulda give Bob Marley millions fi a mawmie rite now...anymore deh a yard doh... a long time mi no see a mawmie at all evano, see Sandi poas bout mammee apple pon page 1...
    http://wwwchem.uwimona.edu.jm:1104/gifs/mammy.jpg

    me neva eat dat yet...wat it taste like?
    - mountaingal, 11 years ago
  • Originally posted by britisha:
    I remember when I was a girl and visited my uncle in St. Mary. There was a grove of guavas right in front of his property across di road; stretching waaay off into the distance.. We used to wander and just pick the guavas off the trees and eat them right there. Sometimes after we bit into them we see worms nestled among the pink fleshy parts. We just threw them away and picked annedda wan.a nuff worm guava mek me eat as a pickney enuh, britisha. me cyaan tell you seh a evry wan me dash weh betime me fine out seh it have worm... /forums/images/graemlins/blush.gif
    - mountaingal, 11 years ago
  • Originally posted by H.O:
    a friend of mine up in Trouthall- near to frankfield inna CLarendon grows lots of citrus...actually, Trouthall is famous for its oranges and citrus yeah, me pass chroo Trout Hall wan time when me was doing a cycling tour of Jamaica in the 1980s. i remember it as a small and peaceful town up inna de hill dem. frankfield is anedda place i found just beautiful - some amazing views.... *sigh* fighting a pang of homesickness

    HO, me neva hear bout French peanut yet...which part dat grow, and weh it taste like?
    - mountaingal, 11 years ago
  • So true, di luxury of just being able to discard as you go along can never be recaptured. By lunch time we were so full I now wonder where we had place to pack anything on top of that. Bwouy a tell yuh, you who were born in the country surely had it good when it came onnn to di nyammings. When I see the flux that the US government allows through the ports and the prices for them, makes me memba dese good ole days...aaahh sah!!
    - britisha, 11 years ago
  • so where is di write up on Lychee?
    an did anybady menshan Star fruit? {di yellowish fruit dat shape like a star an it sowa so till when yu tink bout it yu jaw dem juss lack up tight tight!!!}

    mi waan go home /forums/images/graemlins/frown.gif /forums/images/graemlins/mad.gif /forums/images/graemlins/blush.gif
    - msportmore, 11 years ago
  • Originally posted by Portmore.:
    so where is di write up on Lychee?
    an did anybady menshan Star fruit? {di yellowish fruit dat shape like a star an it sowa so till when yu tink bout it yu jaw dem juss lack up tight tight!!!}

    mi waan go home /forums/images/graemlins/frown.gif /forums/images/graemlins/mad.gif /forums/images/graemlins/blush.gif me a reverse snob enuh, Miss Portmore....dem deh stoosh town fruit haffe come backa de line afta de humble guava and neeseberry and wat not... /forums/images/graemlins/704555_dwl.gif

    if smaddy else no poas bout dem fruit deh, me wi si weh me can do later....
    - mountaingal, 11 years ago
  • Originally posted by mountaingal:

    Originally posted by evanovitch:
    anybadi mention MAWMIE yet...mi woulda give Bob Marley millions fi a mawmie rite now...anymore deh a yard doh... a long time mi no see a mawmie at all evano, see Sandi poas bout mammee apple pon page 1...
    http://wwwchem.uwimona.edu.jm:1104/gifs/mammy.jpg

    me neva eat dat yet...wat it taste like? it hard fi define di taste and aldoh mi is ongle 21 an holding fass,(so tight dat mi finga nail dem bleach out) /forums/images/graemlins/laugh.gif mi no eat it dis long time...but di closest ting to how it look is a cataloupe but di meat firmer an mi really a try tink of what mi coulda compare it to fi mek u taste it so to speak
    - evanovitch, 11 years ago
  • Originally posted by mountaingal:
    Anna, jimbelin wain de pan me liss, but dang if i know what it call officially, so me can fine it pon de Net. me wi try later tonight.

    Waiting :irie:
    - tonirand, 11 years ago
  • MG, mi wouldan di menshan some more but yu poas bout dem already - naesberry, jackfruit, guava, pomgranat /forums/images/graemlins/laugh.gif an all dem sinting deh...

    anyway, mi will wait roun a di back a di line till oonu decide fi chat bout mi lychee dem /forums/images/graemlins/laugh.gif
    - msportmore, 11 years ago
  • HO, I know the fruits you have the two pics, but I never knew it as Annotto ... the Annotto nut is what they call "Bissy/Bizzy". This fruit you have is a fist size husk with the most wickedest prickly stuff inside. Heaven forbid if your fingers ever ketch pon di prickly prickly, dem will drive yu crazy!




    Originally posted by H.O:
    http://wwwchem.uwimona.edu.jm:1104/gifs/fpeanut.jpg guess this...
    - SandiF, 11 years ago
  • There are two types of Jimbilin that I know. This one is what I call Chinese Jimbilin or Carambola

    http://wwwchem.uwimona.edu.jm:1104/gifs/carambola.gif

    The other Jimbilin is a pea size fruit, which makes your mouth pucker up... just thinking of it makes my mouth pucker.
    - SandiF, 11 years ago
  • Passion Fruit

    http://wwwchem.uwimona.edu.jm:1104/gifs/psnfruit.jpg

    The passion fruit is a native of tropical America and was noted by the Spanish in Brazil in the 1500's. There are more than 400 species of which at least 50 or more are edible.

    The two main commercial varieties are Passiflora edulis L. a purple fruit and P. edulis f. flavicarpa a yellow variety.
    Australia is the largest single market for passion fruit and the bulk is used for blending with other juices and in softdrinks.
    - SandiF, 11 years ago
  • One request please,

    Starapple!!! /forums/images/graemlins/tongue.gifray: :irie:

    Tanky


    Anyways, mi nuh gats nummo lunch time suh mi goen agen. I'll check back later.
    - tonirand, 11 years ago
  • Btw, Is two type of Passion Fruit mi know bout, the one that I posted, which we generally call "Passion Fruit" and another type that is smaller in size, called Sweet Cup

    http://www.hear.org/pier/images/pamalp42.jpg

    http://www.hear.org/pier/images/pamalp44.jpg

    Common names: Sweet Cup

    English: hard-shelled passionfruit, sweet calabash, sweet cup

    French: pomme calabas

    Other: pārapōutini ‘enua, pārapōutini Maori (Cook Islands); ka‘atene Maori, katinga Maori (Cook Islands (Mangaia)); pasio (Samoa), vaine kai (Tonga)

    Description: “Leaves with blades entire, ovate, 13-17 x 6.5-9.5 cm, base rounded or subcordate, apex short acuminate, petioles 3-4 cm long with 1-2 pairs of sessile glands; stipules deciduous, floral bracts large, 3-parted, nearly enclosing the mature fruits; fruits spheroidal, 3.5-4 cm in diam., fruit wall yellowish green, hard and woody, 5 mm thick; seed arils translucent white, grape-flavored” (Lorence et al, 1995).

    “Glabrous, woody, tendril-bearing vine. Leaves alternate, ovate-elliptical, up to 15 or more cm long and 8 cm wide, base rounded or subcordate, apex acuminate, petioles 3-5 cm long, bearing 2 glands. Flowers solitary, purplish, axillary on peduncles 5 or more cm long. Fruit about 4 cm long, rind hard” (Yuncker, 1943).

    Habitat/ecology: Naturalizes in disturbed areas from sea level to 300 m.

    Propagation: Seed, spread by birds and animals.

    Native range: Northern South America.
    - SandiF, 11 years ago
  • Just for you Hanna /forums/images/graemlins/smile.gif

    The Jamaican Star Apple

    http://wwwchem.uwimona.edu.jm:1104/gifs/starapp2.gif

    The star apple tree Chrysophyllum cainito is a native of the Caribbean and Central America. It is a member of the Sapotaceae family which includes over 150 species of tree found in tropical and sub-tropical regions.
    In Jamaica, it is fairly common and well known for the luscious fruit and its use as a shade tree. A mature tree attains a height of over 15 metres with a trunk of nearly a metre in diameter.

    Source http://wwwchem.uwimona.edu.jm:1104/lectures/starapp.html
    - SandiF, 11 years ago
  • Originally posted by SandiF:
    There are two types of Jimbilin that I know. This one is what I call Chinese Jimbilin or Carambola

    http://wwwchem.uwimona.edu.jm:1104/gifs/carambola.gif

    The other Jimbilin is a pea size fruit, which makes your mouth pucker up... just thinking of it makes my mouth pucker. A dis mi did a talk bout SandiF /forums/images/graemlins/wink.gif (A Star Fruit mi call it /forums/images/graemlins/blush.gif )
    - msportmore, 11 years ago
  • hi, anna and sandi, oonu no si seh me do starapple areddy pan page 1. me do it early caw is one a me favrite...
    - mountaingal, 11 years ago
  • Coolie Plum

    http://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/morton/images/Plate35.jpg

    Mi favourite Coolie Plum tree was right on South Avenue (?) off Constant Spring Rd. Brooklyn Supermarket did almost facen that road -- Kings Plaza on the Right heading towards W.Kings House Rd, and mussi Lane's Plaza on the left. Mi sey wi could a raid di people dem Coolie Plum tree!! /forums/images/graemlins/laugh.gif

    English: Indian jujube, Chinese apple, Chinese date

    French: jujubier

    Other: manzanas, manzanita, jujube (Guam); baer, bahir, baher (Fiji)

    Description: “Small tree with prickly thorn-like stipules and small simple alternate 3-nerved leaves white (or tawny) tomentose beneath, dark green above, ovate or subelliptic, or slightly rhomboid, mostly less than 6 cm long, finely serrulate; flowers bisexual or male, greenish, in small cymes to 10 cm long; about 5 mm wide; calyx 5-toothed; petals 5; disc large; ovary with 2 styles; fruit a drupe with sweet sour mealy flesh and a 2-seeded stone, orange when ripe.” (Stone, 1970)

    Thorny tree 4-10 m high. Flowers are white or greenish white and the fruits are orange to brown, 2-3 cm long, with edible white pulp surrounding a 2-locular pyrene. (Smith, 1985)

    Habitat/ecology: In Fiji, “sometimes naturalized along roadsides and in agricultural land, uaually near sea level but occasionally up to an elevation of about 600 m” (Smith, 1985).

    Propagation:.Seeds.

    Native range: "Perhaps originally a native of India, Ziziphus mauritiana is apparently now widely naturalized from tropical Africa to Afghanistan and China, and also through Malesia and into Australia and some Pacific archipelagoes; its range as an ornamental is even more extensive." (Smith, 1985)

    Presence:Pacific islands

    hmm, they did not list Cribbean/S.America...
    http://www.hear.org/pier/images/zimau1.jpg
    - SandiF, 11 years ago
  • cooyah! mi just see that you were offering it to rebel. I only hope that she did not eat into the purple part of the skin, 'cause me always hear dat it must not be eaten cause it poisonous. Anybody heva heard of that bout star apple?


    Originally posted by mountaingal:
    hi, anna and sandi, oonu no si seh me do starapple areddy pan page 1. me do it early caw is one a me favrite...
    - SandiF, 11 years ago
  • naw, de purple part just below the skin can be eaten - it is not poisonous. but it WILL give you a butt-breaking case of constipation... :shameu:
    - mountaingal, 11 years ago
  • Jimbelin/Jimbilin also called Otahitie Gooseberry

    http://www.tradewindsfruit.com/otaheite_gooseberry.jpg

    This fruit will make your whole mouth and batty cawna pucker up.

    Phyllanthus acidus

    a.k.a. Malay Gooseberry

    Small white to slightly yellow colored fruit borne in great abundance, with a crunchy, juicy, acidic flavored pulp.

    Source http://www.tradewindsfruit.com/otaheite_gooseberry.htm

    http://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/morton/images/Figure58.jpg

    Totally unlike a gooseberry except for its acidity, the Otaheite gooseberry, Phyllanthus acidus Skeels (syns. P. distichus Muell. Arg.; Cicca acida Merr.; C. disticha L.), is another of the few members of the family Euphorbiaceae having edible fruit. It has been widely distributed and is variously known as Malay gooseberry, country gooseberry, cheremai, chermela, chamin-chamin, or kemangor (Malaya); cherme, tjerme, or tjareme (Java); cherimbillier, tam duot, chum ruot (Vietnam); mayom (Thailand); mak-nhom (Laos); star gooseberry, West India gooseberry, jimbling, chalmeri, harpharori (India.); iba (Philippines); ciruela corteña, manzana estrella (Mexico), pimienta or guinda (El Salvador); grosella (Costa Rica, Cuba, Guatemala, Nicaragua); groselha (Brazil); groseillier des Antilles (French West Indies); cereza amarilla, cerezo comun, cerezo de la tierra (Puerto Rico); cerezo agrio (Venezuela); cerezo occidental (Cuba); wild plum (Belize, Yucatan); cheramina, jimbling, short jimbelin (Jamaica).

    Description

    This is a curious and ornamental shrub or tree, 6 1/2 to 30 ft (2-9 m) high, with spreading, dense, bushy crown of thickish, rough, main branches, in general aspect resembling the Bilimbi (q.v.). At the branch tips are clusters of deciduous, greenish or pinkish branchlets 6 to 12 in (15-30 cm) long, bearing alternate, short-petioled, ovate or ovate-lanceolate, pointed leaves 3/4 to 3 in (2-7.5 cm) long, thin, green and smooth on the upper surface, blue-green with a bloom on the underside; altogether giving the impression of pinnate leaves with numerous leaflets. There are 2 tiny, pointed stipules at the base of each leaf. Small, male, female, and some hermaphrodite, 4-parted, rosy flowers, are borne together in little clusters arranged in panicles 2 to 5 in (5-12.5 cm) long, hanging directly from leafless lengths of the main branches and the upper trunk, and the fruits develop so densely that they form spectacular masses. The fruit is oblate with 6 to 8 ribs; is 3/8 to 1 in (1-2.5 cm) wide; pale-yellow to nearly white when fully ripe; waxy, fleshy, crisp, juicy and highly acid. Tightly embedded in the center is a hard, ribbed stone containing 4 to 6 seeds.

    Origin and Distribution

    This species is believed to have originated in Madagascar and to have been carried to the East Indies. Quisumbing says that it was introduced, into the Philippines in prehistoric times and is cultivated throughout those islands but not extensively. It is more commonly grown in Indonesia, South Vietnam and Laos, and frequently in northern Malaya, and in India in home gardens. The tree is a familiar one in villages and on farms in Guam, where the fruit is favored by children, and occurs in Hawaii and some other Pacific Islands.

    It was introduced into Jamaica from Timor in 1793 and has been casually spread throughout the Caribbean islands and to the Bahamas and Bermuda. It has long been naturalized in southern Mexico and the lowlands of Central America, and is occasionally grown in Colombia, Venezuela, Surinam, Peru and Brazil. Formerly an escape from cultivation in South Florida, there are now only scattered specimens remaining here as curiosities.

    Climate

    The Otaheite gooseberry is subtropical to tropical, being sufficiently hardy to survive and fruit in Tampa, Florida, where cold spells are more severe than in the southeastern part of the state. It thrives up to an elevation of 3,000 ft (914 m) in El Salvador.

    Soil

    The tree grows on a wide range of soils but prefers rather moist sites.

    Source http://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/morton/otaheite_gooseberry.html
    - SandiF, 11 years ago
  • Was this one done... anyway... One of my favourite.

    June/Jew Plum also called Dew Plum and Golden Apple

    http://manny1.hypermart.net/fruits/plum.jpg

    http://www.tradewindsfruit.com/ambarella.jpg

    Spondias dulcis

    Pleasant tasting acidic fruit about the size of an apple with a pineapple-mango like flavor and crunchy texture. Fruit is little known throughout much of the world but better varieties have an excellent flavor.

    Medium tree to 40ft. The ambarella likes a humid tropical climate and will not fruit in areas of frost. Needs a humid climate with ample rainfall.
    Propagation: Usually by seeds which can fruit in 2-4 years.

    June plum can eaten green or ripe. June plum juice is made by blending the flesh with ginger and sweetening with sugar.
    - SandiF, 11 years ago
  • Originally posted by mountaingal:
    hi, anna and sandi, oonu no si seh me do starapple areddy pan page 1. me do it early caw is one a me favrite... Yuk, mi neva like starapple. It did too sticky if mi memba correctly, like it waan glue yuh two lips shut togedda. Taking a rain check on dis one.

    Now, did smaddi seh coolie plum? Kingston pickni dem nebba joke fi stone coolie plum tree, dis a afta dem eat all that dropped to the ground...as I said bfore di sweetest coolie plums were to be found in May Pen simitri. /forums/images/graemlins/laugh.gif /forums/images/graemlins/laugh.gif
    - britisha, 11 years ago
  • Aden seems to be the main mango exported and in the Ethnic markets of NYC, Toronto, London etc.
    Please, Sandi and Mtn. for info on vaieties of mangoes....east indian, bombay, julie, blackies, #11, you know the rest.
    - Q3210, 11 years ago
  • well, my kids totally monopolized the computer last night, so didn't get to research mangos as i'd hoped...but don't fret Q, one of us will, whether me, Sandi or HO... /forums/images/graemlins/smile.gif

    Sandi - me do june plum areddy... :rolleyes: but thanks for that info about jimbelin...man, there was one tree in my district that i remember, and i don't even know why we ate that thing, it was so blasted sour...but eat it we did!
    - mountaingal, 11 years ago
  • Originally posted by britisha:
    Yuk, mi neva like starapple. It did too sticky if mi memba correctly, like it waan glue yuh two lips shut togedda. Taking a rain check on dis one.
    Britisha, If yu noh like starapple, paat a life yu life gone /forums/images/graemlins/laugh.gif

    *sigh* I will be booking me flight tonite... /forums/images/graemlins/frown.gif
    - DC, 11 years ago
  • Mi had a nightmare laas nite enuh! A hole bunch a Jamaican froot a chase mi dung de road. Mi wake up 'fore dem ketch mi doa! /forums/images/graemlins/laugh.gif /forums/images/graemlins/blush.gif

    This is another reference piece MG. It has to be archived! :bigup: :bigup:
    - bandido1, 11 years ago
  • Breadfruit and coconut never de ya to chase yu dung...Please all ye learned folks, Sandi, Mtn G, HOHO et al.
    - Q3210, 11 years ago
  • Originally posted by SandiF:
    Jimbelin/Jimbilin also called Otahitie Gooseberry

    http://www.tradewindsfruit.com/otaheite_gooseberry.jpg

    This fruit will make your whole mouth and batty cawna pucker up.

    Phyllanthus acidus

    a.k.a. Malay Gooseberry

    Small white to slightly yellow colored fruit borne in great abundance, with a crunchy, juicy, acidic flavored pulp.


    chermela, CHERRY MEELA!!! Tank You!!!!!

    A wudda eat some right yah now. :irie:

    Mi fren madda use to tek dem mek jam...it nice yu si /forums/images/graemlins/laugh.gif


    As fi di starapple dat wudda bine up yu dung deh so /forums/images/graemlins/704555_dwl.gif


    Q !!!
    Bresheh fi real. Dat is mi all time favourite fruit. A nice 'turn' one right beside a piece a salt ting. drool, drool, drool
    - tonirand, 11 years ago
  • /forums/images/graemlins/laugh.gif /forums/images/graemlins/laugh.gif /forums/images/graemlins/laugh.gif /forums/images/graemlins/laugh.gif
    Lychee....Lychee....Lychee....Lychee....Lychee....
    Lychee....Lychee....Lychee....Lychee....Lychee....
    Lychee....Lychee....Lychee....Lychee....Lychee....
    Lychee....Lychee....Lychee....
    Lychee....Lychee....Lychee....Lychee....Lychee....
    Lychee....Lychee....Lychee....Lychee....Lychee....
    Lychee....Lychee....Lychee....Lychee....Lychee....
    Lychee....Lychee....Lychee....
    Lychee....Lychee....Lychee....Lychee....Lychee....
    /forums/images/graemlins/laugh.gif /forums/images/graemlins/laugh.gif /forums/images/graemlins/laugh.gif /forums/images/graemlins/laugh.gif
    - msportmore, 11 years ago
  • lol: arite miss squeaky wheel (aka Portmore), here's the grease:

    Lychee, also known in Jamaica as Chinese guinep...
    http://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/morton/images/Plate32.jpg

    A good source of vitamin C. the pearly white, translucent flesh has a lovely aroma and taste, reminds me of rose apple. used often in dessert, and can be bought canned in most asian stores.

    an exboyfriend of mine had a tree on his family property in yallahs - the only lychee tree i ever saw in jamaica.

    i buy lychee in chinatown on occasion. i also like its relative, the [b]longan
    - mountaingal, 11 years ago
  • Originally posted by mountaingal:
    lol: arite miss squeaky wheel (aka Portmore), here's the grease:

    Lychee, also known in Jamaica as Chinese guinep...
    http://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/morton/images/Plate32.jpg

    A good source of vitamin C. the pearly white, translucent flesh has a lovely aroma and taste, reminds me of rose apple. used often in dessert, and can be bought canned in most asian stores.

    an exboyfriend of mine had a tree on his family property in yallahs - the only lychee tree i ever saw in jamaica.

    i buy lychee in chinatown on occasion. i also like its relative, the [b]longan /forums/images/graemlins/laugh.gif :irie: :bigup:
    /forums/images/graemlins/laugh.gif :irie: :bigup:
    - msportmore, 11 years ago
  • Hayden Mango
    http://www.tropicalfruitnursery.com/mango-viewer/images2/hayden.jpg

    Number Eleven Mangoes
    http://www.belizeanjourneys.com/features/mango/mango/4_stages.jpg

    http://www.belizeanjourneys.com/features/mango/mango/mangoes2.jpg
    - SandiF, 11 years ago
  • http://asspaulo.8m.com/manga1.jpg

    http://asspaulo.8m.com/manga8.GIF

    http://asspaulo.8m.com/manga11.jpg

    http://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/morton/images/Plate28.jpg
    - SandiF, 11 years ago
  • http://www-ang.kfunigraz.ac.at/~katzer/pictures/mang_01.jpg

    http://www.desert-tropicals.com/Plants/Anacardiaceae/Mangifera_indica2.jpg

    http://www.plantoftheweek.org/image/mangifera.jpg
    - SandiF, 11 years ago
  • Coconut

    Can one plant have so many use? We use the husk to make floor brush, and nutten can make that hard wood/board floor shine like a willy penny than a coconut brush.

    Broom - raise yu han' if yu use to tek di coconut bough and use it as broom to sweep up di yard!

    Forget the mineral water, a nice refreshing glass of coconut water will clean out yu kidney and liver.

    What about the meat? Soft or hard, it's nice cyaan done. Grater the hard white meat and juice it for your rice and peas. Use the grated trash from the meat for gizzadah and grater cake, or just mix it with some dark brown sugar.

    Who in here can climb or could climb a coconut tree? Well, not me, mi did fraid a height. /forums/images/graemlins/laugh.gif

    http://wwwchem.uwimona.edu.jm:1104/gifs/coconut1.gif

    http://www.pacsoa.org.au/palms/Cocos/nucifera.jpg

    http://www.plantapalm.com/vpe/photos/Species/Pics/cocos_nucifera_infl.jpg

    Fruit Facts

    The ripe fruit of the coconut palm has a hard shell covered by a fibrous outer coat and contains an edible kernel with the coconut in the centre. The nut is split open, and the edible kernel is dried to a moisture content below 6% to prevent deterioration. The dried meat, called copra, is then subjected to pressing or extraction. The residue is known as coconut (oil) meal (or cake), copra meal or poonac. Depending on the milling equipment, the oil residue in the marketed product ranges from 1% to 22%. Hydraulic press residue is usually marketed in flat round cakes, and the other grades are sold in dark-coloured lumps. The product known as sediment meal is quite distinct, however, as it is recovered from the filter pads of the oil-straining presses. On the average 1000 nuts will produce about 180 kg of copra, and the processing of this amount of copra yields about 110 kg of oil and 55 kg of meal, the remainder being evaporated moisture and unavoidable losses. The fibrous coat (husk) has no feed value. The dust from processing the husks into fibre (coir dust) has been suggested as a carrier for molasses. Coconut orchards can be grazed when the leaves can no longer be reached by the grazing animals. It is often necessary to apply extra fertilizer to orchards that are being grazed as the coconut leaves tend to become yellow.

    COCONUT WATER. Coconut water is usually wasted when the nuts are split open. The dry matter content of coconut water declines as the nut matures and is a meagre source of nutrients when the nuts are harvested for copra. On estates the coconut water is sometimes fed to cattle in place of ordinary drinking water. At first it has purgative effect, but cattle soon become accustomed to it. It has also been used as a substrate for the microorganism Rhodotorula pilimanae and as an ingredient of a semen extender for artificial insemination.

    COPRA. Copra is usually too expensive to use as an animal feed, though it has been fed to pigs and poultry with good results. As the fat in copra contains only small amounts of unsaturated fatty acids, its consumption leads to firm body fat and good flavour.

    Source http://www.fao.org/ag/aga/agap/frg/afris/Data/498.HTM
    - SandiF, 11 years ago
  • wow, Sandi,you good! :bigup: love those mango pics and the info about the coconut...

    when i was working in Kingston on a stipend, I used to go to Knutsford Boulevard to buy the cheapest lunch of all - a jelly coconut, which contained both food and drink...$30J, when other people were buying Burger King meals for $160J...
    - mountaingal, 11 years ago
  • u know its funny unu talking bout fruits.,

    but is sunday on CNN, dem did have a special bout de gooseberry talk bout sour.., a who say all u batty carner pucker up.., /forums/images/graemlins/704555_dwl.gif
    - sistactry, 11 years ago
  • I did love stew jimbelin and when it not stewed I eat it with salt...it did nice nice :bigup: Can't tell the last time I even see a jimbelin much less taste one /forums/images/graemlins/frown.gif
    - , 11 years ago
  • [QUOTE]Originally posted by SandiF:
    [QB] Custard Apple
    http://wwwchem.uwimona.edu.jm:1104/gifs/custappl.jpg

    Both in tree and in fruit, the custard apple, Annona reticulata L., is generally rated as the mediocre or "ugly duckling" species among the prominent members of this genus. Its descriptive English name has been widely misapplied to other

    externally and pale-yellow with a dark-red or brownish-red blush, and faintly, moderately, or distinctly reticulated. There is a thick, cream-white layer of custardlike, somewhat granular, flesh beneath the skin surrounding the concolorous moderately juicy segments, in many of which there is a single, hard, dark-brown or

    The custard apple is believed to be a native of the West Indies but it was carried in early times through Central America to southern Mexico.


    A patient (when I worked for VNA) had told me to try Custard apple next time I go to Jamaica. This was back in 1998. I stiil have not been able to find them when I'm there.

    When are they in season ?
    Are they only found in certain parts of the island ?
    - , 11 years ago
  • mi favorite mango...SWEETIE COME BRUSH MI /forums/images/graemlins/smile.gif
    - H_O, 11 years ago
  • HO, only from Manchester and St Bess?

    Gooseberries are what some call Kiwi Fruit, right?
    - Q3210, 11 years ago
  • Originally posted by Q3210:
    HO, only from Manchester and St Bess?

    Gooseberries are what some call Kiwi Fruit, right? No. They're different plants and fruits. The gooseberry is small and does not have a thick inedible skin. The kiwi fruit (or Chinese gooseberry) is larger and has an inedible skin. The tastes are very similar, though the European gooseberry is a bit tarter.
    - Fledgist, 11 years ago
  • surprise nobaddy nain ask bout disya fruit: who can identify it?
    http://www.infomotions.com/gallery/jamaica/Images/DSCN0817.jpg
    - mountaingal, 11 years ago
  • AMMANZ /forums/images/graemlins/704555_dwl.gif /forums/images/graemlins/704555_dwl.gif


    A weh yu fine dat missis?? :bigup:


    For the more 'english' in our midst, ' Almonds' /forums/images/graemlins/704555_dwl.gif
    - tonirand, 11 years ago
  • Originally posted by mountaingal:

    here's the thing about starapples: they have a lot of latex like sap in the fruit, so they are known to be "binding" - eat too many of them and you get a severe case of constipation! this is true I found out the hard way.mi say mi tink mi did a go deded
    - remo, 11 years ago
  • Originally posted by (H)AnnA(H):
    AMMANZ /forums/images/graemlins/704555_dwl.gif /forums/images/graemlins/704555_dwl.gif


    A weh yu fine dat missis?? :bigup:


    For the more 'english' in our midst, ' Almonds' /forums/images/graemlins/704555_dwl.gif well anna, you prove you country cred beyond a reasonable doubt now. a plenty ppl no recognize almond between the fruit and the nut stages. me get de pickcha affa wan man website - him jus call dem seeds, clearly neva know what dem was...

    me used to love hunt fe dry up alman under de tree, den use rockstone fe crack de shell and pick out de alman fe eat. a tell you, NO commercially produced almond have a quarter of the taste of those tiny almond nuts we used to eat dung a St. Bess.


    Almond Facts
    ALMONDS
    California produces 80% of the world's supply of almonds.

    Chocolate manufacturers currently use 40 percent of the world's almonds and 20 percent of the world's peanuts.

    Historians generally agree that almonds and dates, both mentioned in the Old Testament of the Bible, were among the earliest cultivated foods.

    Almonds are actually stone fruits related to cherries, plums and peaches.

    Japanese teenagers enjoy snacking on a mixture of dried sardines and slivered almonds. (California Almond Association)

    The world's largest almond factory is in Sacramento, California. It processes 2 million pounds of almonds a day.

    It takes 1000 pounds of almonds to make 1 pint of almond oil.

    The Jordan almond is a large plump variety of almond from Malaga, Spain, considered to be the finest cultivated almond. . The are frequently sold with a hard colored sugar coating, or salted.


    so, the almond from tree to tongue goes like this:
    yellow ripe almonds on the tree:
    http://images.google.ca/images?q=tbn:llTbgZEmKfQC:www.sierragoldtrees.com/images/almonds.jpg

    you eat the yellow part to get to these:
    http://www.infomotions.com/gallery/jamaica/Thumbs/DSCN0817.jpg

    then those are dried and the fibre stripped to get to this:
    http://images.google.ca/images?q=tbn:V3ZfbEObebwC:www.mikesnuts.com/nuts/almond.jpg

    which you then crack open to get this:
    http://images.google.ca/images?q=tbn:22vfbAn4j6YC:www.zionic.com/images/almond.jpg
    - mountaingal, 11 years ago
  • Originally posted by remo:

    Originally posted by mountaingal:

    here's the thing about starapples: they have a lot of latex like sap in the fruit, so they are known to be "binding" - eat too many of them and you get a severe case of constipation! this is true I found out the hard way.mi say mi tink mi did a go deded bwoy, remo, we used to mek fun of wan anedda as pickney, see who long deh a toilet true dem eat tummuch starapple meat.

    i think the starapple may be a relative of the rubber plant, enuh!
    - mountaingal, 11 years ago
  • MG

    A gwine mek some ammaz draps dis week en /forums/images/graemlins/wink.gif Mi use to love it wen mi likkle /forums/images/graemlins/laugh.gif
    - tonirand, 11 years ago
  • i never heard of almond drops! coconut drops and peanut brittle, yes...but almonds, no.

    how dat mek? poas you recipe nuh?
    - mountaingal, 11 years ago
  • It mek same like coatnat draps man. Mi nevvah try it wid farrin ammanz yet but mi aggo geet a chry. /forums/images/graemlins/laugh.gif

    Lawd. O fi di days. Mi did have a nice fren oo use to mek dem fimii. Mi kyaa coutn di mount a time mi lik off mi big fingah head fi one likkle piece a sinting /forums/images/graemlins/mad.gif :rolleyes:

    Ahhh well..

    Mi aggo gi di ammans draps a shat an si 'ow it wuk out

    /forums/images/graemlins/wink.gif
    - tonirand, 11 years ago
  • so where is makafatplease to put it up here amongst de royality dem /forums/images/graemlins/blush.gif :rolleyes: /forums/images/graemlins/laugh.gif
    - grandma2, 11 years ago
  • grandma2, i'm hunting high and low for a pic of the macca fat palm (acrocomia spinosa), but no luck yet... /forums/images/graemlins/frown.gif
    - mountaingal, 11 years ago
  • Please to advise: wat dat is??

    Mi nevvah hear bout it before /forums/images/graemlins/confused.gif

    Tanky
    - tonirand, 11 years ago
  • Miss MG, that is the almond. There are two types, The smaller one is what we called the 'woodseed' from the broadleaf tree.

    The taste of the nut is a cross between cashew and coconut. That is another thing why life nice growing up a country sah. 'We go a bush go buss woodseed.'

    GM2, eh eh, den if dem put up makafat, den dem no hafi to put up prittle pole tu.
    - aferan, 11 years ago
  • lawd have His mercy afaran,yu knoh how lang mi nuh hear bout prittle pole :eek: , lawd a wanda if dat still deh bout /forums/images/graemlins/laugh.gif
    - grandma2, 11 years ago
  • Originally posted by mountaingal:

    Originally posted by (H)AnnA(H):
    AMMANZ /forums/images/graemlins/704555_dwl.gif /forums/images/graemlins/704555_dwl.gif


    A weh yu fine dat missis?? :bigup:


    For the more 'english' in our midst, ' Almonds' /forums/images/graemlins/704555_dwl.gif well anna, you prove you country cred beyond a reasonable doubt now. a plenty ppl no recognize almond between the fruit and the nut stages. me get de pickcha affa wan man website - him jus call dem seeds, clearly neva know what dem was...

    me used to love hunt fe dry up alman under de tree, den use rockstone fe crack de shell and pick out de alman fe eat. a tell you, NO commercially produced almond have a quarter of the taste of those tiny almond nuts we used to eat dung a St. Bess.


    which you then crack open to get this:
    http://images.google.ca/images?q=tbn:22vfbAn4j6YC:www.zionic.com/images/almond.jpg mi is challenging mountaingal fi prove to me how she use fi crack ammond a yaad an get dem dem nut so purrfek...mi always had fi a pick pick out pieces outa di trash...cause afta mi nyma di skin an meat, a stone mi haffi use fi crack di nut an mi neva once get a big piece fi nyam...an i is unamimous in dat :rolleyes: /forums/images/graemlins/laugh.gif
    - evanovitch, 11 years ago
  • Evan,

    Mi use to get dem out wullah cause mi tun dem pon di edge, kench it wid mi big fingah an pointing fingah an geet one lik wid di rackstone.

    Dat mek di shell open at di seam an mi get out a nice wullah ammanz /forums/images/graemlins/laugh.gif
    - tonirand, 11 years ago
  • Prittle Pole...wha dat?
    In the hills of St. Ann between Alexandria and Claremont there lies a district...Prickly Pole.
    - Q3210, 11 years ago
  • Q, The prittle pole is a palm. Like the macafat it is the coconut in miniture. As the name implies, the trunk is just like a slender pole covered with thousands of long sharp spiny needles. Even the fronds are covered with these needles.

    The nuts grow in berrylike clusters at the base of the crown of fronds. The nuts are green but when ripe they turn to a beautiful crimson. These nuts are about the size of small playing marbles. It is just a mini coconut without space for the water.
    - aferan, 11 years ago
  • Originally posted by grandma2:
    lawd have His mercy afaran,yu knoh how lang mi nuh hear bout prittle pole :eek: , lawd a wanda if dat still deh bout /forums/images/graemlins/laugh.gif Grand Ma, prittle pole still dey bout but nobody ago mess up and go near dat tree. de only creatures ago mess wit them is the rat bat and fool fool pickney like meself.

    You know how many times me haffi use orange maca to get pieces of prittle pole maca out of my foot.

    Den Grand Ma, you see how dem people pan ya bias? No one mention our beloved Calabash goard. Wha appen, dat no fruit tu? Because it no full our guts we a go ignore it.

    Look how many uses we put that fruit to. We even used the young goard to catch chicken hawk.

    Den when we eat all de other fruits and we belly full we turn to the goard fe mek music. De goard versitile no wah!
    - aferan, 11 years ago
  • Here are some interesting facts about Jamaican Food Local foods provide a powerhouse of vitamins, minerals and other
    nutrients good for the body and soul. Nutritionist Patricia Thompson says the
    next time you go shopping, reach for Jamaican-grown produce because they
    are the best.


    IN OUR quest for healthier eating choices we are encouraged to eat
    foods with less fat and sodium, more fibre, more complex carbohydrate and
    lower in calories. The foods that are most promoted are usually imported
    since more is known about them than about our local foods. We may therefore
    seek out whole grain cereals and breads, fruits such as the American apple,
    plum and grapes and vegetables such as broccoli and cauliflower.


    AMERICAN APPLE VS. GUAVA

    Who has not heard the adage, 'An apple a day keeps the doctor away'?
    This is probably because the American apple has fibre to facilitate gut
    health and rid the body of waste. But do you know that one guava fruit has
    four times the amount of fibre, slightly more potassium and 19 times the
    amount of vitamin C as an American apple?


    Likewise, it would take 15 American apples to supply the vitamin C
    content of only one West Indian cherry. In comparison to a whole bunch of
    grapes, one guava has 25 times more vitamin C, four times more fibre and about
    the same potassium.


    CRANBERRY JUICE VS. COCONUT JUICE


    Cranberry juice has become very popular because of its benefits to
    bladder health. But have you thought that similar benefits could be had from
    coconut water at less than half the calories and with appreciably more
    potassium? A glass of cranberry juice will provide 150 to 200 calories
    while the same glass of coconut water contains only 50 calories while
    giving 400 mg potassium compared to the 60mg for cranberry juice.


    For those concerned about the sodium content of coconut water, be
    assured that a single glass will provide only 60 mg sodium compared to the 700
    mg in a V8 canned vegetable juice. Also, coconut water has no fat. The
    fat of the coconut resides in the jelly and will thus be found in coconut
    milk, but there is no cholesterol since the coconut is of plant origin and
    cholesterol is found, only in foods of animal origin.


    This means that butter will have cholesterol but coconut milk, like
    the vegetable margarines, is free of cholesterol. Moreover, the
    traditional way of cooking with coconut milk for flavour is better that using
    margarine which is often substituted in porridge, rice and peas and soups. A
    tablespoon of coconut milk has only 38 calories and 4g fat compared to
    111 calories in the same amount of margarine and 11.5 g fat. Also, the fat
    of coconut is healthier for the body than margarine fats.


    OLIVE OIL VS. ACKEE AND PEAR

    OLIVE OIL VS. ACKEE AND PEAR
    Two other sources of fat that are often mislabeled are the Jamaican
    ackee and the avocado pear. Neither has any cholesterol and the fat is
    monounsaturated, the same type of fat that we pay so much for in the
    olive oil.


    BROCCOLI, CAULIFLOWER VS. CALLALOO


    Admittedly, broccoli, cauliflower and Brussels sprouts, like other
    vegetables will provide vitamin C, minerals, flavonoids and other
    phytochemicals but they are no match for our local callaloo (amaranth)
    in terms of calcium, iron or vitamin A.


    Callaloo has more than four times the calcium; two or more times the
    iron with more than twice the vitamin A as the American vegetables. The
    whole grain cereals are indeed a good source of fibre but calorie for
    calorie our provisions are equally beneficial.


    The Irish potato, brown rice and whole kernel corn provide the least
    fibre per serving. Those of better value are whole wheat bread, green banana
    and sweet potato providing 1.5g per serving of about 70 calories.


    ROLLED OATS VS. BREADFRUIT


    Richer still is rolled oats at 1.96g but topping the list, you guessed
    it, is our local breadfruit at 2.45 for a serving of two slices.
    So next time you reach for the foreign goods on the shelf, don't
    forget our local products are the best.


    Patricia Thompson M.Sc. Registered Nutritionist, the Nutrition Centre,
    Eden Gardens, Kingston
    - chubble, 11 years ago
  • Originally posted by (H)AnnA(H):
    Evan,

    Mi use to get dem out wullah cause mi tun dem pon di edge, kench it wid mi big fingah an pointing fingah an geet one lik wid di rackstone.

    Dat mek di shell open at di seam an mi get out a nice wullah ammanz /forums/images/graemlins/laugh.gif well mi a challenge boat u an mountaingal fi meet mi a yaad nex year a di bashment mek wi have a ammond brukking contess /forums/images/graemlins/laugh.gif
    - evanovitch, 11 years ago
  • Originally posted by aferan:

    Originally posted by grandma2:
    lawd have His mercy afaran,yu knoh how lang mi nuh hear bout prittle pole :eek: , lawd a wanda if dat still deh bout /forums/images/graemlins/laugh.gif Grand Ma, prittle pole still dey bout but nobody ago mess up and go near dat tree. de only creatures ago mess wit them is the rat bat and fool fool pickney like meself.

    You know how many times me haffi use orange maca to get pieces of prittle pole maca out of my foot.

    Den Grand Ma, you see how dem people pan ya bias? No one mention our beloved Calabash goard. Wha appen, dat no fruit tu? Because it no full our guts we a go ignore it.

    Look how many uses we put that fruit to. We even used the young goard to catch chicken hawk.

    Den when we eat all de other fruits and we belly full we turn to the goard fe mek music. De goard versitile no wah! lawx, me have nuff catching up fe do wid disya chread. :eek:

    Mass Afer, me neva hear bout prittle pole, and me wain ting me as country as country could be. maybe dat a sittn weh grow inna more humid environments than the hot and dry santa cruz plains where i grew.

    i saw some pics of spiny palms, but not the one that seemed to be maccafat (sorry G@ /forums/images/graemlins/frown.gif ). De prittle pole ting, me haffe seh, me no ting me a go fine dat. A prickly pear demma try seh?

    as fe de calabash, afer, it nat sweet, so me nat inlcuding it in disya chread... /forums/images/graemlins/tongue.gif but feel free to contribute... /forums/images/graemlins/laugh.gif
    - mountaingal, 11 years ago
  • Originally posted by evanovitch:

    Originally posted by mountaingal:

    Originally posted by (H)AnnA(H):
    AMMANZ /forums/images/graemlins/704555_dwl.gif /forums/images/graemlins/704555_dwl.gif


    A weh yu fine dat missis?? :bigup:


    For the more 'english' in our midst, ' Almonds' /forums/images/graemlins/704555_dwl.gif well anna, you prove you country cred beyond a reasonable doubt now. a plenty ppl no recognize almond between the fruit and the nut stages. me get de pickcha affa wan man website - him jus call dem seeds, clearly neva know what dem was...

    me used to love hunt fe dry up alman under de tree, den use rockstone fe crack de shell and pick out de alman fe eat. a tell you, NO commercially produced almond have a quarter of the taste of those tiny almond nuts we used to eat dung a St. Bess.


    which you then crack open to get this:
    http://images.google.ca/images?q=tbn:22vfbAn4j6YC:www.zionic.com/images/almond.jpg mi is challenging mountaingal fi prove to me how she use fi crack ammond a yaad an get dem dem nut so purrfek...mi always had fi a pick pick out pieces outa di trash...cause afta mi nyma di skin an meat, a stone mi haffi use fi crack di nut an mi neva once get a big piece fi nyam...an i is unamimous in dat :rolleyes: /forums/images/graemlins/laugh.gif skillz, baby, you gots to have skillz fe get wholla almond... /forums/images/graemlins/laugh.gif
    - mountaingal, 11 years ago
  • Originally posted by (H)AnnA(H):
    Evan,

    Mi use to get dem out wullah cause mi tun dem pon di edge, kench it wid mi big fingah an pointing fingah an geet one lik wid di rackstone.

    Dat mek di shell open at di seam an mi get out a nice wullah ammanz /forums/images/graemlins/laugh.gif school ar deh fe me, anna, lol! it's all in the technique...

    gosh, getting back some lovely memories of hunting almonds in Missa Daniels yard...*sigh&
    - mountaingal, 11 years ago
  • Originally posted by chubble:
    Here are some interesting facts about Jamaican Food Local foods provide a powerhouse of vitamins, minerals and other
    nutrients good for the body and soul. Nutritionist Patricia Thompson says the
    next time you go shopping, reach for Jamaican-grown produce because they
    are the best.


    IN OUR quest for healthier eating choices we are encouraged to eat
    foods with less fat and sodium, more fibre, more complex carbohydrate and
    lower in calories. The foods that are most promoted are usually imported
    since more is known about them than about our local foods. We may therefore
    seek out whole grain cereals and breads, fruits such as the American apple,
    plum and grapes and vegetables such as broccoli and cauliflower.


    AMERICAN APPLE VS. GUAVA

    Who has not heard the adage, 'An apple a day keeps the doctor away'?
    This is probably because the American apple has fibre to facilitate gut
    health and rid the body of waste. But do you know that one guava fruit has
    four times the amount of fibre, slightly more potassium and 19 times the
    amount of vitamin C as an American apple?


    Likewise, it would take 15 American apples to supply the vitamin C
    content of only one West Indian cherry. In comparison to a whole bunch of
    grapes, one guava has 25 times more vitamin C, four times more fibre and about
    the same potassium.


    CRANBERRY JUICE VS. COCONUT JUICE


    Cranberry juice has become very popular because of its benefits to
    bladder health. But have you thought that similar benefits could be had from
    coconut water at less than half the calories and with appreciably more
    potassium? A glass of cranberry juice will provide 150 to 200 calories
    while the same glass of coconut water contains only 50 calories while
    giving 400 mg potassium compared to the 60mg for cranberry juice.


    For those concerned about the sodium content of coconut water, be
    assured that a single glass will provide only 60 mg sodium compared to the 700
    mg in a V8 canned vegetable juice. Also, coconut water has no fat. The
    fat of the coconut resides in the jelly and will thus be found in coconut
    milk, but there is no cholesterol since the coconut is of plant origin and
    cholesterol is found, only in foods of animal origin.


    This means that butter will have cholesterol but coconut milk, like
    the vegetable margarines, is free of cholesterol. Moreover, the
    traditional way of cooking with coconut milk for flavour is better that using
    margarine which is often substituted in porridge, rice and peas and soups. A
    tablespoon of coconut milk has only 38 calories and 4g fat compared to
    111 calories in the same amount of margarine and 11.5 g fat. Also, the fat
    of coconut is healthier for the body than margarine fats.


    OLIVE OIL VS. ACKEE AND PEAR

    OLIVE OIL VS. ACKEE AND PEAR
    Two other sources of fat that are often mislabeled are the Jamaican
    ackee and the avocado pear. Neither has any cholesterol and the fat is
    monounsaturated, the same type of fat that we pay so much for in the
    olive oil.


    BROCCOLI, CAULIFLOWER VS. CALLALOO


    Admittedly, broccoli, cauliflower and Brussels sprouts, like other
    vegetables will provide vitamin C, minerals, flavonoids and other
    phytochemicals but they are no match for our local callaloo (amaranth)
    in terms of calcium, iron or vitamin A.


    Callaloo has more than four times the calcium; two or more times the
    iron with more than twice the vitamin A as the American vegetables. The
    whole grain cereals are indeed a good source of fibre but calorie for
    calorie our provisions are equally beneficial.


    The Irish potato, brown rice and whole kernel corn provide the least
    fibre per serving. Those of better value are whole wheat bread, green banana
    and sweet potato providing 1.5g per serving of about 70 calories.


    ROLLED OATS VS. BREADFRUIT


    Richer still is rolled oats at 1.96g but topping the list, you guessed
    it, is our local breadfruit at 2.45 for a serving of two slices.
    So next time you reach for the foreign goods on the shelf, don't
    forget our local products are the best.


    Patricia Thompson M.Sc. Registered Nutritionist, the Nutrition Centre,
    Eden Gardens, Kingston excellent stuff, chubble! jamaican fruits rule!

    aldoah me hear seh a true ackee dat nuff Jamaican man have prostate problem...something to do with the fat? /forums/images/graemlins/confused.gif
    - mountaingal, 11 years ago
  • time for another entry...the Paw Paw or, as the stoosh ppl say, the papaya...
    http://www.2747.com/2747/food/papaya/papaya.jpg

    when green, is renowned for its power to sawfen meat and aid digestion.

    when ripe, is known for its perfumed sweetness. a friend of mine, when she finishes scooping out the paw paw, she rubs the skin over her face as a kind of astringent.

    Nutrient Value
    Excellent source of vitamin A and C, and potassium. Papaya are high in ascorbic acid content (vitamin C) and the flesh is very high in Vitamin A. There are also small amounts of calcium, iron, thiamine, riboflavin and niacin present in papaya. It is low in calories and sodium and high in potassium.
    Contains a digestive enzyme that is used to tenderize meat. Papain is an enzyme extracted from the papaya skin and is primarily used in the meat industry as a tenderizer. The papaya (Carica papaya) fruit is very rich in papain. The greener the fruit the more active is the papain. This protein-digesting (proteolytic) enzyme is very abundant in green, unripe fruits. This unique quality of papaya makes it an excellent natural meat tenderizer.Source (http://www.2747.com/2747/food/papaya/)

    and of course, we've heard of the myth of the paw paw tree. what was it again? if it grow too near de house it cut man nature? /forums/images/graemlins/laugh.gif

    http://www.astro.caltech.edu/~vam/treeimages/papaya.jpg
    green pawpaw growing on a tree. i think these ones grow to the giant size, rather than the little ones pictured above which i used to buy at HiLo for my breakfast...
    - mountaingal, 11 years ago
  • arite afer and G2, tell me dis...is dis de macca fat or de pritty pole?
    http://waynesword.palomar.edu/images/peji5b.jpg

    http://www.pacsoa.org.au/palms/Bactris/gasipaes.jpg
    - mountaingal, 11 years ago
  • Miss MG, Nice try but nither prittle pole nor macafat. Never seen that palm.

    Is that date? I have never seen the date palm.
    - aferan, 11 years ago
  • hmm, the second tree is supposed to be the first tree from a different angle, but it could be a different tree.

    you no notice seh de firs tree have spines along the trunk? or it too tall fe maccafat/pritty pole?

    the trees are supposed to be the peach palm, peyjaba palm in some south/central american countries...

    dates look different, more oblong, and a darker maroon red...

    back to the drawing board
    - mountaingal, 11 years ago
  • The Maccafat known as the "Macaw Palm" latin name Acrocomia Aculeata is different from the "Pritty/Prickly Pole" also known as Prickly Palm, latin name Aculeata Media tree.

    The pic you posted Mountaingal looks like Prickly Pole, but mi not too certain. Here are a few pics of the Macaw (Maccafat) Palm tree.

    http://www.biologie.uni-hamburg.de/b-online/library/palms/acrocomia_aculeata.JPG

    http://www.biologie.uni-hamburg.de/b-online/library

    http://www.plantapalm.com/vpe/images/acrocomia-jody-june-2002-1.jpg
    - SandiF, 11 years ago
  • For days I'm fighting with trying to remember the name of this fruit that grows on a viney wild plant. We used to see them often in Barbican... let me see if I can describe it...

    It's a very pale green, almost yellowish in colour

    it's very small, kinda like a pod, and the outer skin is prickly...

    the inside is almost the same pale yellowish/greenish tinge, and it have some likkle seeds which you suck out. Actually, you just crack it and suck out the pulp and seed. Have a little tangy taste. I'll never forget one year about '78 or so, there was a major drought, we used run go dung a gully bottom where this wild fruit grows in abundance and feast on it ... great thirst quencher.

    This is a wild fruit, grows on a vine...
    - SandiF, 11 years ago
  • Sandif, a sweetcut you a discribe yasso. Maybe Miss MG can find some pics.

    There is also another fruit that look like sersie and have a pod with some red sweet bitterish seeds. The vine usually runs on fenses or walls. I think the name is verivine. I am not sure.

    Another thing is that the macafat does not drop its nuts. Uniquely, the John Crow eats the skin of the macafat for whatever reasons and then spill the nuts to the ground minus the skins. This is the only fruit that this bird is known to eat.

    Otherwise, adventurous young men climb the macafat tree and cut the ripe bunch from the base of the fronds. The fruits are protected at the upright base of the fronds so that they dont spill to the ground,

    After sucking the bloods of cows and other animals, the rat bat eats the skin of the ripe prittle pole nut and then drop the little nuts on the ground.

    For some unknown reasons we as kids went out to the cluster of Prittle pole trees an get juk.
    - aferan, 11 years ago
  • Hey aferan, a belated welcome on board the Board.
    You, MG and Sandi are a wealth of knowledge on fruits/ trees Jamaica, even the rat bat too.
    Thanks for the prittle pole explanation.
    The illustrations are quite attractive and familuar to us who have at sometime or another seen them in reality.
    The palm family has plentiful types, some we apparently dont have in Jamaica like the Date palm.
    Paw Paw`s inner skin, MG is a soother and a good application for skin irritations and mild burns especially when cooled in the fridge.
    Paw Paw/ Banana blended with a little strawberry syrup is a lovely drink.
    Talk about syrup....You know how we have a special affinity to that..
    - Q3210, 11 years ago
  • Originally posted by Q3210:
    Hey aferan, a belated welcome on board the Board. but tap, Q - you no recognize afer? /forums/images/graemlins/704555_dwl.gif im is the same Jcans.com oldtimer under a new name...
    - mountaingal, 11 years ago
  • aahhh... sweetcup for true afer.
    - SandiF, 11 years ago
  • When dem christen into a new name, how am I to know its the same old smaddy?
    I dont know much about behind the scenes goings on.
    Nice to see the enlightening posts.
    - Q3210, 11 years ago
  • Originally posted by Q3210:
    When dem christen into a new name, how am I to know its the same old smaddy?
    I dont know much about behind the scenes goings on.
    Nice to see the enlightening posts. you fe read de board more.... /forums/images/graemlins/tongue.gif den you wouldaan know...
    ((Q))

    that pawpaw/banana medley sounds delicious, though I'd probably leave out the syrup...
    - mountaingal, 11 years ago
  • Originally posted by SandiF:
    aahhh... sweetcup for true afer. Sandi - is it dis?

    Passiflora malformis, aka sweetcup, aka, sweet calabash
    http://www.hear.org/pier/images/pamalp44.jpg
    http://www.hear.org/pier/images/pamalp42.jpg
    - mountaingal, 11 years ago
  • Sour sop blossom on top of the sweetcup.
    - Q3210, 11 years ago
  • This is a great thread :bigup:

    Thanks MG because most of these fruits I have only heard of...maybe one day, I will ge to try some of them.

    As long mi favorites deh deh dat is all mi care bout /forums/images/graemlins/laugh.gif /forums/images/graemlins/laugh.gif
    - babydoll, 11 years ago
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